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230′ Rope Jump is Reborn…

 

About 3 years back while highlining in the vast desert of Utah, a new and innovative rope swing concept was born and put into practice. As a balanced community of highliners who constantly seek out elevated challenges, we’re regularly spanning gaps in space and above slot canyons which present new opportunities for recreating with gravity. In this case, the idea of using the middle of a highline as a potential floating anchor emerged between the creative minds of Jan Galek, Faith Dickey, Jordan Tybon and myself… As a warm up and trial rig for larger rope swing opportunities in mind, we created a “short” 70 foot pendulum swing over a shallow bowl of sandstone. The jumps were successful and the rigging was solid. We all laughed and rejoiced in the fun we were having, then moved onto our next highlining destination as usual. This new location presented greater potential for free fall into space and as we considered the project we were undertaking, our butt holes puckered and our hearts began to race. Upon finishing the trial rig, we anxiously stared into the abyss below and imagined ourselves hurdling through the air in the biggest pendulum swing we had ever seen or considered possible. Since it was my birthday, my generous friends, needing a willing guinea pig, offered me the first jump to test out the rig and to check the clearance between the canyon walls (note that we first used a weighted haul bag as a test). After the adrenaline subsided and grinning faces transitioned into nervous expressions, everyone was psyched about what had been accomplished.

 

Flash forward many years later… After hundreds more highlines had been rigged and experience was gained in the elevated world, I was approached by my Moab Monkey teammate, Scott Rogers, to supervise the construction of my previous ground breaking rope swing. The video montage I had edited after the first rig was completed surprisingly captured the attention of over 400,000 YouTube viewers and was even featured on several Japanese television shows and CNN in the United States. With a greater following and viewing of what we had made, a new group of successful film makers were eager to repeat the experience and capture it in a new innovative way. Devin Supertramp, who boasts over 870,000 YouTube followers and over 150 million views on his video channel, was excited about the new project. What I originally thought would be a time of supervising and monitoring the safety of this complex project became a more involved undertaking for both Scott and I. We became directly responsible for the rigging, safety and preparation of over 15 jumpers during the course of a 2 day filming period. With great pride, no one was injured or hurt during the frigid conditions, and everyone left with a HUGE smile and greater appreciation for our creative pursuits. Scott and I also were able to help film and document the experience from high angle positions, hanging from ropes in precarious places in the 400 foot abyss, where other film makers were unable to access and document with comfort. This is where we are most naturally talented, hanging in space and maintaining a calm smile is where we shine as highliners. We give into the pulling gravity and intimidating positions, allowing for us to focus on getting the shot and help out new friends to create this wonderful masterpiece which you now can see. Several of our shots were used in the final edit and the Moab Monkeys had the awesome opportunity to network with new and inspiring film makers… We look forward to the brainstormed projects to come this spring and fall with Devin and his crew, to give a greater perspective of BASE jumping and highlining in new locations.

Featured above is the final edit of Devin’s hardwork and editing skills put into practice, and below is the video which tells the behind the scenes story of how it all went down. I hope you all enjoy the finished products!

 

P.S. Stay tuned for a full edit of another rope swing I rigged at Smith Rock State Park… Here’s a sneak preview of the jump, sorry for teasing so much.

~Brian Mosbaugh

A New Era of Adventure Sports

Andy Lewis getting the full-man send and FA of Ilbo Baggins atop Raptor Tower.

Andy Lewis getting the full-man send of his newly established tower line, Ill-Bo-Baggins. This monster weighs in at 262 feet long!

In my many years as a traveling athlete and documentarian, I’ve had the incredible privilege to work with countless talented individuals while capturing an array of adventure sports and outdoor lifestyles. Many of the amazing people I’ve met along the way have since become long time friends and companions, with whom I spend a lot of time sharing epic adventures and moments of fear in high places. Throughout the process of improving my balance and pushing my limits as an athlete and rigger, I’ve also chosen to film and photograph the progressing sport of highlining. I was originally motivated to do so because I realized the unique value in what I was witnessing around me and a lack of people documenting it. World records were casually being shattered, new highlines invented and projects seemed to be getting bigger and bigger with greater momentum. Very few of us had nice cameras, or cared much to record these events, because we were too busy actively “doing” rather than documenting. At a certain point I had to make some big decisions about how I wanted to spend my energy and invest in my future. I eventually bought a camera and began devoting more time behind the lens, where I now experience these adventures from new perspectives. I would love to say everything has been easy during the transition from doing to filming, but it hasn’t always been so. Finding the appropriate balance between participating with the experience and setting myself apart to capture it, has at times been very hard. It’s one thing to be casually laughing and chatting with your friends in nature and quite another to be posted up on a distant cliff alone to document it all. Sometimes I have the strong urge to put the camera down and return to the moment without the filter of a mechanical lens, but the longer I spend finding balance with my chosen responsibilities it all comes together in a healthy way. Over all, I realize I’m in an incredibly unique position to be immersed in the evolving progression of a new developing sport and to simultaneously be there capturing it in real life. Despite having to sacrifice personal time for my own athletic improvements, in return I get to share the radness of what my friends and I are accomplishing behind the scenes of a modern city life. Hopefully the shared images and films have reminded others that adventure is still alive, and that wild places exist for getting lost and finding oneself again.

Andy Lewis getting the full-man send and FA of Ilbo Baggins atop Raptor Tower.

Andy Lewis getting the full-man send of his newly established tower line, Ill-Bo-Baggins. This monster weighs in at 262 feet long!

If you ask any of my close friends regarding the footage I’ve accumulated over the years, I’m sure they’ll express a certain frustration that it’s not posted on Youtube or any other public website. Well, it’s a true statement but one that has an explanation… I absolutely love being in the field to capture the action of adventure but I’ve struggled to muster the same enthusiasm for sitting in front of a computer screen for endless hours to edit it all. I was never hoarding such material without the intention of sharing it, I was just always on the move and living out of my car from one destination to another. My focus was based on continuing to be active and to document the experience along the way, with the expectation that one day the right time would come and I would sit down in a creative space to put it all together in a digestible manner. With the creation of this website, I finally have the platform to release it and a real house where I’m able to process the material. In addition, I had long been searching for a partner in crime to share the story telling experience and collaborate on future projects to capture more than one angle. I’m proud to announce that Scott Rogers is the man and we’ve recently begun working together on a series of video edits to finally share online. In little time, we’ll be launching our first compilations together under the new team title of Moab Monkeys. Both Scott and I have long been documenting the slacklife with a shared commitment and passion, and now we have the opportunity to pool our creative minds together to accomplish some impressive feats. Our goal is to be always documenting the adventurous lives of gifted athletes in the fields of slacklining, rock climbing, BASE jumping and many other disciplines, from all around the world. The mission statement is to inspire others to pursue better balanced lives and to spread the love for outdoor adventure as a beautiful means of experiencing life.

Hayley Ashburn walking like a champ!

Hayley Ashburn walking like a champ while the crew hangs out on Raptor Tower!

As we sift through our extensive archives of unpublished media and prepare to release some edits, we’re still continuing to fill up our hard drives with new material of current projects on a daily basis. In Moab, we balance our time and energy editing on computers and playing outside, trying not to take life too seriously. We love to travel and enjoy life, and at the moment we anxiously await the return of our passports with a new travel visa inside. After an amazing month last year raging in Thailand, where as a group of ten highliners and climbers we established new world-class highlines, deep water solo routes and over a dozen new waterlines, we’ve decided to team up on another expedition with Andy Lewis and Hayley Ashburn again. As of mid-February we’ll be setting off on a 35 day expedition to Brazil, where we plan to explore and document the lush jungles, beaches and waterfalls with epic slacklines and BASE jumping in mind… Stay tuned for new footage to be released and updates on life in Brazil!

~Brian Mosbaugh

Yosemite Origins of Highlining

Yosemite National Park is a majestic land rich in climbing history, a long Native American presence and marked as the birthplace of modern highlining as we know it today. For a long time it’s been preserved as a sacred place of grandeur and natural beauty, dominated by an abundance of extraordinary waterfalls, diverse wildlife and gigantic granite walls that erupt from the valley floor reaching for the heavens. Without a doubt, these glacial polished amphitheaters beckon to every rock climber and adventure seeker to test their courage and strength on the towering white rock above. Attempting to capture the scale and impressive qualities of El Cap (short for “The Captain”) and the rest of Yosemite’s environments is hard to convey in words, but the feeling and perspective of seeing the larger than life white cliffs for the first time will leave any visitor with a lingering sense of awe that will be remembered for a lifetime. As millions of tourists filter into the park every year, the scene at Camp 4 and around Curry Village can leave the outdoorsman with a sense of claustrophobia and unease, but luckily the backcountry is only a short backpacking distance away, where the hustle and bustle of millions of tourons (common nomenclature for “tourists” and “morons”) can be avoided if you have a solid set of hiking legs. Leaving the crowds behind, along with the many domesticated Yogi bears trying to steal your PB&J sandwich, is where true adventure can be found.

El Cap

Yosemite FallsI’ve been frequenting different parts of Yosemite for the past 5 years, and it was during my first visit to the park when a new passion was sparked and my worldview was absolutely shaken. I think back at my first experiences looking up at Yosemite Falls as the marked catalyst for what triggered the falling dominoes in my life, profoundly altering the events which have lead me to my current niche. It’s sometimes difficult to define the moment or origin of such an impacting life change, but seeing Yosemite Falls from below (towering some 3,000 feet above the Valley floor) left me with a yearning for adventure which I couldn’t resist. Instead of witnessing the roaring waterfall as simply another impressive creation of mother nature, my senses were dumbfounded by the sight of humans casually walking above its crest of falling water on a piece of one-inch webbing. This was incredible and I had to experience it for myself.

Yosemite Falls

My previous year of life had been defined by a nomadic migration living out of my car with an irresistible obsession for rock climbing. After being introduced to technical climbing in college, and constantly watching films of young men and women traveling the world with a singular obession, I was inspired to follow in their footsteps. Unlike many university graduates who haphazardly question their post-school life, I knew exactly what I wanted and more importantly I knew how to get there. Since finding my vertical passion I had begun taking summer classes and studying constantly to graduate from the University of Oregon as fast as possible. The moment I turned in my last homework assignment was the day I left my old structured life behind, with no regrets to follow. I opted out of walking at graduation, not caring that I had finished in the top 1% of my class in the Romance Language department, in order to uproot my life into a vehicle and see the world from new heights. My journeys lead me from one climbing destination to the next, beginning in Squamish, Canada and heading south along the west-coast corridor to many world-class climbing meccas. I touched many cliffs and boulders around Smith Rock, Bishop, South Lake Tahoe, Yosemite, Joshua Tree and many other pocketed areas in new terrain. I simply followed the seasons chasing the endless summer, when I eventually ended up moving east toward Hueco Tanks State Park and landed in Flagstaff, Arizona. The year had been phenomenal and I had progressed from bouldering at a beginners level to sending V10 in some of the best climbing destinations in this country and world. My sport climbing abilities saw a spike in technical improvement, my gear placements were improving and my strength to weight ratio was exponentially on an upward trend, until IT happened… Injury set in… I was bouldering one day in Arizona and heard the dreaded/heart breaking sound that plagues the minds of active climbers with many nightmares. SNAP went the pulley in my middle finger, the swelling commenced quickly and tears seeped from my eyes near the base of the boulder. For the average person working a 9-5, this is not a common injury, but for climbers who put extreme amounts of physical strain on their fragile fingers, it’s unfortunately a relatively common occurrence. For a “dirtbag climber” living and breathing to scale upward, this can be a serious time of change and potential depression. After realizing I wouldn’t be climbing hard for at least another 6 months to a year, I had to make some new life decisions. Like all events in life that appear both tragic and liberating, there was a lesson to be learned here and life would go on. My path of simple living and constantly dreaming about the next route had to shift…

Lost Arrow Spire

Russ Phetteplace sending the classic Lost Arrow Spire Highline, 3,000′ above the Valley floor.

Lost Arrow Spire Highline

Russ Phetteplace practicing yoga on the classic Lost Arrow Spire Highline, 3,000′ above the Valley floor.

Shortly afterward, I found myself backpacking into the depths of the Grand Canyon for a week where I hoped to find answers to new life questions. Fast forward to the next stop on my journey, back to Yosemite National Park, and my life would once again find new direction… I simply looked up and saw the most beautiful highline in the world where Andy Lewis and Jerry Miszewski were walking in space. In my previous climbing experiences I had begun casually slacklining in a park around Eugene, OR. It was around the same time when I was introduced to rock climbing outdoors at Smith Rock State Park, where I treated slacklining as a common rest day activity from the routine of cranking down on rock and torturing my tendons. By chance I had also rigged and walked the classic Monkey Face Highline at Smith Rock after starting to walk a slackline six-months before, but the thrill wasn’t enough to overcome my climbing interests. I was very terrified of the couple hundred feet of exposure below and was shaken by the mental focus needed to walk in balance, but the level that these highliners were operating at 3,000 feet above the Valley floor was on a new level of Jedi!

Lost Arrow Spire Highline

Rigging the classic Lost Arrow Spire Highline

Long Lost Arrow Spire Highline

Jason Lakey sizing up the Long Lost Arrow Spire Highline

With my finger severely injured and the reality of long recovery seeping in, I needed to find another way to keep my brain stimulated, my body moving and my soul happy. I decided then and there, at the base of the grandiose Yosemite Falls, that highlining would become my new life focus. Since that day, my life has lead me on a path of world travel in pursuit of combining both my passions in a balanced way to see the world from new perspectives. It was inevitable that I would eventually buy a camera and attempt to capture this unique space, and so continues the constant challenge of finding the right angle and image to capture my friends/heroes being awesome in nature. The act of rigging a highline and walking above the great abyss is an almost indescribable sensation, but I try my best to convey its beauty through moving and still images. This challenge stimulates my senses and leads to profound feelings which define my character in a way I’ve never encountered before. Sometimes the walk is calm and meditative, while other moments are filled with fear and terror, shaking my sanity and balance. I suppose it’s because of these contrasting reasons that we all push our personal limitations of what we think is possible in the void. The slackline community which faces these challenges and adventurous pursuits ironically tends to be very grounded, supportive and happy as a result of this. My fellow highlining, climbing, BASE jumping and rigging companions are now more like a family to me, they all tend to understand my worldview and meaning of life. It is with them that I find acceptance and understanding.

Photo by Daniel Carrillo

Brian Mosbaugh taking a break on the Taft Point Highline with El Cap in the backdrop. Photo by Daniel Carrillo

Our dreams are filled with BIG goals which straddle what’s possible and impossible, and for this reason we’re always pushed in new directions and extremes where we intimately learn something new and exciting everyday. For this reason, we remain young despite our age and push on like there is no tomorrow, because the present is what matters most. Instead of accumulating a 401K plan, most of us share destitute lives which often clash with the rules and values of a modern society that accumulates material wealth and a secure routine. I’m not claiming that we are super human and above these motivations, but we cultivate a lifestyle of balance with our every action and strive toward a simple life where the great outdoors is both our home and playground. For this reason, we respect the wild places where we dwell, adventure and smile together. In chasing down these dreams of elevated adventure, constructing arbitary lines in space, jumping into the abyss and climbing large rocks for no apparent reason, I’m somehow reminded of my small size and become immediately humbled. I don’t exactly know why we do, what we do, but a love for the outdoors and a humbled feeling of being with this family is what keeps me coming back for more…

Rigging

Eric Rassmussen rigging the Long Lost Arrow Spire line

I’ve included some photos and a video of a highlining trip I took to Yosemite in 2010 and 2011 to accompany these words. These images are a tribute to how inspiring Yosemite National Park is and it’s also a tribute to those that have taught me so much along the way. I want to thank Scott Balcolm for setting a new standard of adventure by walking and establishing the Lost Arrow Spire Highline back in 1984. You did the world a favor on that day. I also want to thank Jerry Miszewski, Pierre Carrillo, Eric Rasmussen, Jeremy Louis, Julien Desforges, Hayley Ashburn, Russ Phetteplace, Damian Cooksey, Emily Sukiennik, Jan Galek, Faith Dickey, Jordan Tybon, Damian Czermak, Mical Korniewicz, Andy Lewis and SO MANY others who not only inspired me to find greater balance in my life as I was learning to walk a slackline but who also shared with me their wealth of knowledge in rigging and living gracefully against the grain of modern expectations. I hope these words and images will have somehow inspired others to follow their own dreams with passion. May everyone continue to inspire and be inspired!

~Brian Mosbaugh

Yosemite Falls Rigging

Russ Phetteplace hanging out in the exposure during the rigging of the Yosemite Falls Highline

Aerial Adventure Perspectives

 

 

Since 2013 has rolled around, outside temperatures in Moab, UT haven’t been above freezing for very long… In fact, they’ve been hovering in the teens mostly and dropping as far as -15 degrees Fahrenheit at night! When it comes to the winter, and cold climate in general, I typically scare away running south to environments resembling summer and pretend the planet doesn’t tilt on its axis in a balanced way. This year, however, has brought on new changes and challenges and I’m finally starting to embrace, if not tolerate, these very cold conditions. My camera batteries are in revolt from the decision but remain relatively cooperative, allowing for some incredible feats to be captured with a little extra charging. One might assume I would take up a winter sport now and finally enjoy the mountains on skis or a snowboard, however, my passion continues leading me on a path of highlining, rigging and adventure filming/photography in this beautiful space of unlimited desert adventure. Since returning from Joshua Tree during the holidays, I left beautiful Utah in its typical glory of red cliffs and warm temperatures only to return to a different, yet subtly familiar landscape, which maintains a lingering layer of white and has given me a new appreciation for indoor heating.

Scott Rogers sending Mario during sub-zero temperatures in Moab, UT.

Scott Rogers sending Mario during sub-zero temperatures in Moab, UT.

The weeks have “flown” by as one project has led into the other, all of which have been full of new learning experiences and opportunities to meet amazingly gifted people with a similar drive to document adventure sports on the cutting edge. Above is a brief trailer of footage compiled between Slacklinemedia.com, Monkey Den Media and the epic SkySightRC team which Andy Lewis, Scott Rogers, Daniel Moore and I have been working with to capture some of the most breathe taking and inspiring highlining/B.A.S.E. jumping footage I’VE EVER WITNESSED captured on film. I’m so excited to be surrounding myself and working with such motivated and talented individuals. Every person has contributed somethings special to this project and I very much look forward to the adventures to come from all our hard work and raging in the cold. As history tends to repeat itself, the continuing cycle of adventure is guaranteed to mature into the next step of what is shaping up to be an amazing year so far!

Scott Rogers sending Mario during sub-zero temperatures in Moab, UT.

Scott Rogers sending Mario during sub-zero temperatures in Moab, UT.

For more information concerning SkySightRC and the awesome work they’ve been doing, check out the links listed below. Make sure to “Like” their pages and follow up on continuing projects as they capture life from new unparalleled aerial perspectives never before seen!

To Check out what the extreme athletes of Moab Monkeys are up to around the world, subscribe to our new YouTube channel and stay up to date with our adventures on Facebook.

During the filming for a SkySightRC film shoot Andy Lewis and Scott Rogers simul-walk the Mario Brother highlines (established by Scott and Andy) as Daniel Moore prepares for his B.A.S.E. exit.

During the filming for a SkySightRC film shoot Andy Lewis and Scott Rogers simul-walk the Mario Brother highlines (established by Scott and Andy) as Daniel Moore prepares for his B.A.S.E. exit.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Daniel Moore getting his BASE on at the infamous Tombstone formation.

Ancient Artwork of a balanced kind

Ancient Artwork of a balanced kind

Snow capped Moab landscape

Snow capped Moab landscape

The Floatline

Jared Alden tests his balance on the newly constructed  "Floatline," consisting of 5 slacklines meeting in space to create this 130' long beast. The floatline was tensioned by hand, without the aid of pulleys, making for a very loose and disorienting line to attempt. It still remains unwalked...

Jared Alden tests his balance on the newly constructed “Floatline,” consisting of 5 slacklines meeting in space to create this 130′ long beast. The central line was tensioned only by hand, without the aid of pulleys, making for a very loose and disorienting walk to attempt. The three combined images create an accurate depiction of this experimental and creative rigging design. The approximate depth of exposure is about 400′ making for a very dizzying and disorienting experience. Of the handful of accomplished highliners who attempted this line, very few made progressive movement on it with the exception of Jared Alden. He was able to link his advances with several falls while demonstrating impressive composure despite the loose and challenging circumstances. The line was engineered by Brian Mosbaugh and Julien Desforges in Moab, Utah.

Jared Alden tests his balance on the newly constructed  "Floatline," consisting of 5 slacklines meeting in space to create this 130' long beast.

Jared Alden tests his balance on the newly constructed  "Floatline," consisting of 5 slacklines meeting in space to create this 130' long beast.

Line of the Lost

SONY DSCThe life of a Moab highliner often involves a lot of wandering in the desert and traveling over rugged and rocky terrain via 4 wheel-drive vehicles. The approaches are typically pretty short but for this most recent project the hike was half the battle while the driving portion meandered casually along nice asphalt for once. The trip from Moab passes through a pleasant corridor of rock cliffs alongside the Colorado River eventually leading into Castle Valley, providing a refreshing scenery of mountains, rock towers and scattered mesas with infinite highline potential all around. As the snowy peaks of the La Salle Mountains begin to show signs of accumulating snow caps, the temperatures are beginning to cool as winter nears and projects continue to rage onward and upward. After an hour of hiking alongside steep scree slopes, across cliffs with fixed lines (known as a “via ferrata”) and eventually up vertical ropes leading through chimneys of rock you arrive atop the playing field. Parriott Mesa is the ballpark which stands out as an incredible highline location with vistas and exposure hard to beat anywhere in the world. It was during this last summer that Hayley Ashburn, Andy Lewis and Scott Rogers established the first highline here, a beautiful line appropriately named “Rim with a View,” as it showcases the La Salle Mountains in the distance, quaint farm fields below, multiple desert towers nearby and the infamous Fisher Towers almost out of sight. During my first trip to the top of this formation I was blown away by the natural beauty and the room for adventure it beholds. Not only is Parriott Mesa well known by rock climbers in the area for its epic pick of desert cracks leading up amazing phallic towers but it’s also the site of many BASE jumping exits. In fact, it’s currently one of the few destinations where local BASE jumping professional, Mario Richard, has established a business of tandem BASE jumping!

SONY DSCUpon getting to the summit of the mesa with heavy packs and friends Richard Webb, Ethan Holt, and Ryan Matson (accompanied by our canine friend Big Fuzz, who patiently waited below) we were all psyched to get our rig on and start walking amidst this stunning landscape. As we finished tensioning the line and putting on harnesses I was both excited to walk the line and capture some incredible images of my friends being bad ass. The rig was ultimately walked by all of us with many smiles and a bright sun in our face for the majority of the day. Photographing highlines in this condition can often be a difficult task if you don’t get the right light or angle from the sun, but that days mission provided ample opportunities to snap off some amazing shots. Luckily for me, with the remaining rope from our pulley set-up, I was able to rappel down the cliff a short ways to access a small ledge and get a new angle on the line. Below are some photos which demonstrate the beauty of Utah’s desert, mountains and local monkeys.

RiggingLocal Moab climber/highline developer, Ryan Matson, takes a casual stroll in paradise atop Parriott Mesa on "Rim with a View." This location offers access to some of the most amazing tower climbs in the area with equally amazing views of Utah's staggering landscape.

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After spending the day walking “Rim with a View” it appeared obvious that many new highlines could be established atop this formation. What caught our eye most was a longer version of the line we were walking, which extended out to a more exposed prow that jutted into greater space, offering dizzying views and exposure. So with our minds made up to come back soon and excitement coursing through our veins, we charged the drill battery that night and prepared for the next day’s adventure. Following the same slog path and 1,500 plus feet of climb to the summit, we returned with heavier packs and anticipation for a new highline. It turned out that only Ethan and I were able to come back a couple days later after waiting out some rain. With our psyche high and legs well rested we had enough energy to get the job done and install a new addition to the growing resume of Moab highlines. The new project, to be named “Line of the Lost” (since the terrain vividly reminded us of what Land of the Lost would look like) was a great success. Measuring in at about 140′ long with approximately 400′ of direct exposure beneath, and another many 1,000′ of visible dizzying drop, we were psyched to put another notch on the belt of projects conquered. Both Ethan and I were first to walk the line, Ethan getting the send in one direction and myself walking it full-man and on my first attempts on-sight. This is one of many desert adventures which Ethan and I have embarked on and it never gets old sharing such unique experiences with best of friends. I feel honored and blessed to be surrounded by such motivated people in my life…

This is of course not the last or longest line to be established atop Parriott Mesa. On the same day as walking “Line of the Lost” Ethan and I installed anchors for another highline along a different aspect of the mesa. The new project looks to be around 200′ long, with amazing exposure beneath and the potential for a swingline if people were so inclined to help carry more ropes to the summit. So with that being said, life continues on here in Moab with many promises of adventure ahead and countless more towers to climb and span.

~Brian Mosbaugh

B.A.S.E. + HighlineSONY DSC

Parriott Mesa

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